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click here: ERNEST LOCKRIDGE'S RESPONSE TO LARRY LOCKRIDGE

MONUMENT
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Ernest Lockridge: Housepaint on Canvas, 30x40

     

             "Write the greatest single piece of literature ever composed."

Ross Lockridge, Jr.

 

 Following Houghton-Mifflin's acceptance of his novel in 1946, my father wrote for the publisher's publicity wing a lengthy "story" of how RAINTREE COUNTY came to be written.  This 1946 "story" begins thus: "One spring day in 1934 a 19-yr.'old American boy sprang suddenly from his typewriter and began to pace back and forth.   This was the idea-genesis of RAINTREE COUNTY . . .   It was on that day [in Paris] that Ross Lockridge, Jr., awakened to the fact that certain 19th century backgrounds in the life of his own family could be transmuted into the content of of a novel, which, if it fully realized the possibilities might really merit the title of 'The Great American Novel.'" RFL, Jr., 1946

 

 

But my father's 1946 "story" fails to mention the feverish 1934 journal into which "the 19-yr.-old American Boy" in Paris then proceeded to pour his ideas, plans and literary ambitions to write The Great American Novel.  This buoyant, frenetic 77-page handwritten manifesto by the Artist as a Young Man of 19 is absolutely essential to any true understanding of Ross Lockridge, Jr.'s famous novel and his tragic death. 

 

Ernest Lockridge

  Professor Emeritus of English and Creative Writing

The Ohio State University 

 

CLICK HERE to download the 1934 PARIS JOURNAL of ROSS LOCKRIDGE, JR.

Ross Lockridge, Jr.
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Shortly before committing suicide

COURTHOUSE BUTTE, SEDONA
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ERNEST LOCKRIDGE, wax & acrylic on canvas, 16x20 (private collection)

CLICK HERE: Laurel Richardson, WHY I LOVE ERNEST

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 "You see, but you do not observe."
Holmes to Doctor Watson

AN OPTICAL ILLUSION CALLED THE GREAT GATSBY presumes to "observe" what Fitzgerald meant when in 1924 he excitedly wrote a friend that The Great Gatsby (published 1925) was "a new thinking out of the idea of illusion."
The precise nature of Fitzgerald's illusion-making—its technique or léger-de-main, and its centrality to the novel as a whole—remains more or less a mystery to this day. Small wonder the author complained following his novel's appearance that “of all the reviews, even the most enthusiastic, not one had the slightest idea what the book was about.”
Since the novel's publication in 1925, readers, in particular those luckless enough to have been "taught the novel" in colleges and universities, have been indoctrinated into believing that Fitzgerald's masterpiece is essentially an embodiment of that stale illusion or fantasy (which GATSBY, itself, never mentions) called "The American Dream." The novel Fitzgerald actually wrote is infinitely more profound, interesting and universal.
The Culture--both high and low--sees GATSBY as most certainly "Great." A recent list of "top-100-novels" ranked it #1. Readers and critics alike consider now consider it THE contender for "The [illusory] Great American Novel." And, now girding its loins against another mindless Hollywood extravaganza, this one starring some drop-dead cutie named Leonardo butchering the title role, THE GREAT GATSBY has been apotheosized into a NEW YORK TIMES best-seller in fiction. High time to "observe" the drop-dead wonderful book F.Scott Fitzgerald was putting on the page some four score and ten years ago.
 
Ernest Lockridge, PhD (Yale University)
Professor Emeritus of English and Creative Writing 
The Ohio State University
Author, Twentieth-Century Interpretations of The Great Gatsby 
 

Click Here: THE GREAT GATSBY MURDER MYSTERY

 
 
 
 
 
                                                  AVAILABLE FROM AMAZON.COM
                                      KINDLE $2.99
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Click Here:HARTSPRING EXPOSED

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Ernest Lockridge

  These magnificent Icelandic ponies were jammed together in a tiny corral at the edge of Gullfoss (Golden Falls) in Iceland. "The strangely elided and juxtaposed shapes of two big horses stand flank by flank, nearly fill the canvas, and create a study in design and color that is baffling.--As I recall, a splat of midnight sun, or perhaps a day time moon--is visible here.  And iconic white aurioles, sun-like splats, glimmer in other of Lockridge's paintings.--But you have to look.  The aesthetics of design and abstraction are present in LOST IN ICELAND.  Yet, the large truncated shapes of the two horses suggest something primitive and one cannot help but think of pre Norse myths and legends." Liz James ArtScene

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LOST IN ICELAND, acrylic on canvas, 28x38--NFS

Ernest Lockridge, artist
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Tahiti, oil on canvas, 16x20

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                                           FIRST PLACE

    High Road Gallery Exhibit, "Spice of Life," March 6, 2011 

FIRST PLACE, High Road Gallery Exhibit, 3-6-2011
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"Iceland:Parting at Dusk," acrylic and wax on canvas
WEB SITE
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Acrylic on Canvas, 16x20
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OAK CREEK CANYON, Wax&Oil on Canvas, 16x20

CLICK HERE: ABRIDGED VERSION, "AN OPTICAL ILLUSION CALLED THE GREAT GATSBY"

     
FIRST PLACE, "Double Take" Exhibit at The High Road Gallery, Worthington, Ohio--July 4, 2010.  "Real, actual, contrasting the ideal aspirations of advertising with the truth of the street.  Honest photo." Judge: Emeritus Professor Tom Hubbard, The Ohio State University School of Journalism and Communications.

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HOMELESS, San Francisco, June 12, 2009, photograph (Not Photoshopped or retouched)

                 THE BIG WHEEL ROLLS

                  TO THE FINAL STOP,

                  END OF THE LINE,

                  THE DREAM'S DRY BOSOM,

                   THE SAFETY NET,

                   THE LAST CALL:

                    "IT'S FOR YOU."

                                    E.L.

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OAK CREEK CANYON III, Wax&Oil on Canvas, 16x20

FIRST PLACE, Fall Exhibit, High Road Gallery, 12 E. Stafford, Worthington, Ohio, through Nov. 21, 2009.  "A tribute to painting.  The bold and deliberate use of texture and shape forms an unusual 'scape.'  This painting, deriving its title from a James Baldwin book, is textural--with a large T, and becomes a tribute to brush work, to painting.  As a judge I look to find technical prowess combined with uniqueness.  This painting presents originality and daring yet it is grounded in painterly skill."

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THE FIRE THIS TIME, acrylic on canvas, 24x36
 "And God gave Moses the rainbow sign: No more water, the fire next time." (Old Spiritual)
        "A gorgeous canvas . . . painted in Georgia O Keefe country in New Mexico, and in it masterful gradations of reds, oranges, browns, form a blizzard of tree foliage that nearly covers the side of a non descript ranch house.  The colors . . . are on fire, smouldering." Liz James ArtScene
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JACK'S CANYON TRAIL, Sedona, Oil&Wax on Canvas, 16x20

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SAFFRON ROBE, acrylic on canvas, 24x36 (Private Collection)

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FORCE OF NATURE (Large Island, Hawaii), acrylic on canvas, 24x30

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BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF MY BACK YARD, acrylic on canvas, 22x28 (NFS)

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DEEP WOODS, acrylic and wax on canvas, 16x20

SEDONA EVENING
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acrylics and wax on canvas, 16x20

ALL TOGETHER NOW, Wax and Acrylic on Canvas, 16x20
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SEDONA RUNES, mixed
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WINDOW ON THE WORLD, acrylic and mixed, 11x14

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PENELOPE, mixed media, 11x14
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ARE WE THERE YET? acrylic on canvas, 24x30--NFS

"He is not afraid of color. His use of it although broad, is harmonious, meticulous . . . Yet his canvasses ...emit an electric charge." CLICK HERE to upload the Liz James ARTSCENE review of my Worthington Arts Council Exhibit "WINTER DREAMS"

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THE HONEY PATCH, acrylic on canvas, 24x24

 "Lockridge's chosen modus, wisely, tends toward the maxim that 'less is more' . . .  [This] foray into grids and pure abstraction is striking yet understated."  ArtScene

"PARK OF ROSES" (below) received the PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARD, 2008 SPRING ANTHEM EXHIBIT, sponsored by the Worthington Area Art League:

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PARK OF ROSES, acrylic on canvas, 11x14 (Private Collection)
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APHRODITE, mixed media, 11x14 (Private Collection)

Please click on link to Simon&Schuster

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TRANSFERENCE, wax and acrylic on canvas, 18x22
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THE DEAF PARK, acrylic and wax on canvas, 16x20
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KAUAI, acrylic and wax on canvas, 16x20
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FOR ALL iI KNOW, wax and acrylic on canvas, 16x20
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FRONDS, acrylic and wax on canvas, 16x20

CLICK HERE: INCENDIARY INTERPRETATIONS of Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Ross Lockridge Jr. and others, by Ernest Lockridge

   HAVE SIGHT OF PROTEUS RISING FROM THE SEA
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CLICK HERE: THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH, March 19, 2009

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SEDONA DUSK, acrylic on canvas, 20x26

This painting arose from an overwhelming desire for a world of pink, violet, amethyst and gold.

"The hues of SEDONA DUSK emit lavender-sagebrush-deep purple-fragrances--if you can see fragrances!" Artscene
"SEDONA DUSK enhances the mystical, magnetic effects of this spiritual location through complex monochromatic pigmentation.  The viewer receives information, sensation and light through the artist's energetic brush work." Elizabeth Chrisman, Judge, "Arts Alive in Technicolor,"Worthington Area Art League Spring Show, March 2010, High Road Gallery, Worthington, Ohio

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EN CAMARGUE, wax and acrylic on canvas, 16x20



Note also: My father Ross Lockridge Jr.s great American novel RAINTREE COUNTY--the cry of a mortally wounded spirit--has just been reissued by the Chicago Review Press.  RAINTREE COUNTY was the favorite novel of Jim Morrison of THE DOORS.

http://RAINTREECOUNTY.COM

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CLICK TO DOWNLOAD: CORRESPONDENCE regarding "SHADE OF THE RAINTREE, the Life and Death of ROSS LOCKRIDGE JR., author of RAINTREE COUNTY"

       "Your ms. lays out the central pattern of the relationship between RFL Jr. and Sr., but without sufficient weight or emphasis.  Its figure-in-the-carpet lies in the struggle that persisted throughout Dad's life to create an identity separate from the man whose name he bore and who tried from childhood on to obliterate him--making Dad his amanuesis, his ghost-writer, all-round employee, Junior, the One Chosen to take over and thus be ultimately subsumed by Senior's life.  RFL Sr. relentlessly dogged Dad to subordinate himself to those endless "projects."  Note well that Dad objected strenuously to the British edition of Raintree County's appearing without the "Jr."  RFL Sr. felt and acted as though he OWNED his namesake, and Dad had this [indentured servitude] to struggle against.  It's in your narrative, but buried--or off to one side, in the shadows.  At times it seems that you exert your greatest ingenuity in trying to dismiss any serious Dark Side to this father-son dance of wills (to de-Leggett your story? to douse in advance any possible ember of what you know I think?).  However ineffectual and diminished the Father may be as a person, he remains in some living part of the Son's mind a GIANT.  It requires no sexual dimension to understand how, in the end, giving himself over to the "smotherer" might contribute to the feelings of entrapment, powerlessness, worthlessness, and loss of self that lie at the base of Dad's suicidal depression."  E.L.

GROWING UP LOCKRIDGE

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INTO THE LIGHT, acrylic on canvas, 18x20 (Private Collection)
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TEETH OF THE LION, Wax and Acrylic on Canvas, 16x20

TRAVELS WITH ERNEST
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CLICK HERE to Download DARTMOUTH PROFESSOR JAMES M. COX regarding TRAVELS WITH ERNEST

CLICK HERE: Regarding TRAVELS WITH ERNEST

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CONVERGENCE, acrylic on canvas, 20x24

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Cover Image for ACCIDENTAL ETHNOGRAPHY by Christopher N. Poulos (Left Coast Press 2008)

My painting, MOON ROCK, provided cover art for the book, LAST WRITES, A DAYBOOK FOR A DYING FRIEND, by Laurel Richardson, published by Left Coast Press, 2007:

http://lcoastpress.com

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Laurel

Professor Laurel Richardson: http://sociology.ohio-state.edu/lwr

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BELL ROCK MIRAGE, acrylic on canvas, 18x24

CLICK HERE: from FLYING ELBOWS

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WHITE NIGHTS provides inter-textual design for the book LAST WRITES.  In the painting it's 2 a.m.:

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WHITE NIGHTS, ICELAND, acrylic on canvas, 24x36 (Private Collection)

      We stand on Race St. and look down Jew Lane, in the tiny village of Greeve, Tasmania.  The naming of "Jew Lane" appears to be lost in the mists of time, though the proprietor of a restaurant offstage right says, "I think maybe a Jew lived there once."
     "Lockridge's [painting] is grounded in his technical aplomb and in his familiarity with work of 'greats'--ranging from Sargent to Grandma Moses to Native American pictographs to the cave paintings at Chauvet.  On his artist's statement he says that he began to use his first set of Sargents (!) paints when he was eight years old.  Now he uses thickly applied paint and obvious brush strokes, like the Impressionists did.  He is not afraid of color.  His use of it although broad, is harmonious, meticulous.  The tall BURNING BUSH, TASMANIA, seems about to explode with raw color and linear shapes."  ArtScene

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JEW LANE, TASMANIA, acrylic on canvas, 30x36
My wife Laurel, whose father was Al Capone's attorney in the 1920's, lived as a child in this Chicago building, whilst in the building across the alley resided an entire tribe of Gypsies.  She and her childhood pet mutt Happy look apprehensively down at Mimi--our pet Abyssian Red--who rules the alley, and the world.
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TWO WORLDS, acrylic on canvas, 30x36 (NFS)

CLICK HERE: from PRINCE ELMO'S FIRE. Also, MARK SCHORER's letter to me

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 "Lockridge has mastered the elements of composition and color.  Yet, his canvasses manage to shimmy, to emit an electric charge.--It's brush strokes in motion!  This is true of TIDAL POOL, YUCATAN, in which a very small man in red trunks swims his way thru huge sheafs of white water toward the opening crevice that might suggest the birth canal.  Lockridge's paintings are all somewhat abstract, yet his majority of them include elements of the representational.  The swimmer in red trunks is a swimmer in red trunks!"

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TIDAL POOL, THE YUCATAN, acrylic on canvas, 24x38 (NFS)
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By Design, acrylic on canvas, 18x20--(Private Collection)

 
 
 
 
                                    PYRAMIDS (after Monet)

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Ernest Lockridge, Oil on Canvas, 16x20--Private Collection
   
 
 
                                          OUT OF BOUNDS

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                     Ernest Lockridge, Housepaint on Canvas, 30x40

 

 

 

OUT OF BOUNDS

 

Watch out

Where the foot lands

Elbow, ball, eye, thought

Wandering

Beyond the grid

The Stop

Sign

Warning:

"Invisible Fence"

Apple, Grail, the Greenest Grass

In No Man's Land

Point of No Return

Don't go there

DON'T YOU DARE 

                     E.L. 

Questions or comments? You can send me e-mail at:lockridge.1@osu.edu